What was the inspiration for this dress?

I noticed a growing trend for revealing wedding dresses. My dress have a lot of structure and support inside because I want brides of all figure shapes to be able to wear the design they fall in love with. So I wanted to create something that had a low back and front with full support enabling a bride who needs support, but wants the sultry, sexy, slinky, low-cut look, to wear with confidence.
Charlotte_fashion showAny interesting stories?

The model, Charlotte who wore Jagger in our runway show embodied the sexy, fun-loving spirit of this dress perfectly. Here she is wearing it before, on and off stage!
The jaggersHow did it get its name?

We felt like this was a bit of a party girl dress, but still with an immense amount for grace and style, so we names it after a family who instantly came to mind.

Style tip: Big sparkly earrings!


Reminded of the beauty…
I’m busy right now adding the finishing touches to my 2017 collection (which is looking utterly divine – I’m already thinking about fashion show music! I’m feeling a gangster rap/Barbara Steisand mash up…).

Working so far ahead has its downsides though. My excitement for the new collection has often dwindled by the time it hits the boutiques. I started designing the current Runway Rebel collection in 2014 so you can appreciate there is nothing new about it for me any more. I liken it to when you have just decorated and, for a few months, you bask in the newness, your own creativity, vision, and beauty of it but, after a while, it just becomes normal to you. It’s only when a friend pops by who hasn’t seen it yet, and is blown away, that it reminds you that the same beauty still exists, you’ve just forgotten to appreciate it.
The same happened for me this morning, not for my Llewelly-Bowen imitations, but for the Runway Rebel Collection. We collaborated with creative duo Katherine Gwen and Sebastian Pons for the photo shoot last June. They have written a blog post about the shoot. The out-takes reminded me of all the hard work and passion, and the mood boards reminded me of how beautiful and cool the collection is. It truly felt like I was seeing it again for the first time!
Read the full blog post here: Ian Stuart Blog Post


What was the inspiration for this dress?

I wanted to design a beautiful classic and timeless wedding dress, which still had that Ian Stuart touch. I focused on creating a beautifully draped bodice and neckline that would flatter any bride and make her feel sensational.
Look book compare
Any interesting stories?

For the Runway Rebel collection, I introduced a beautiful new silver colour to my silk satin range specifically for this design. The first women to ever wear it was my friend and longstanding Ian Stuart runway model Tope, which was during our line-review. When she came out of the changing room, we all gasped. The combination of the silver and her skin colour was breath taking! I decided immediately that she would open the show in that dress.

How did it get its name?

I wanted a name that captured the timeless appeal of the gown and which would make a lasting impression. No, it wasn’t name after the Beauty and the Beast character, although he is described on DisneyWiki as kind-hearted, charismatic, yet rebellious, which is an apt fit for the collection! It is actually named after the Lumiere brothers, inventors  of motion picture camera, the Cinematographe. Their invention pioneered an exciting new form of art (and entertainment): cinema, have anything else made such a lasting impression on the world, and allowed us to witness so much beauty?

Style tips:

The bodice is so beautiful and would enhance any figure, I wanted it to appeal to more brides, and give them the choice of wearing it as a mermaid or A-line. It’s worth trying both to see how they each make you feel, you might be surprised by which silhouette you prefer.
I also couldn’t help showing you this behind-the-scenes shot of the mermaid version, it’s such a beautiful still moment!

Winning an award feels a lot like receiving a gold star at school, when you’re the only one in class who did! Expect as a child you can gloat and show off without knowing any better, you can’t really get away with that as an adult… and that’s not for want of trying. Sadly the fluffy cloud nine ‘I’m the winner’ euphoria doesn’t last long. However, the feeling of achievement definitely helps your motivation and encourages you to be the best that you can be.

We are up fro some awards, and I need your votes if I’m going to get my next euphoria hit! However instead of political style campaign speech, I thought I’d tell you some stories of how awards have played a part in my career, then you can decide whether to give a jaded designer a motivational boost or not!


Awards have played a significant role my life. I won a couple as a student, one for young milliner of the year, where the winning three hates went on sale in Debenhams (ooh the original Designer at Debenhams!) And a swimwear competition sponsored by Piz Buin, I designed a chocolate swimsuit covered in crystals and a floor length taffeta pool coat with a big bow on the back! Not practical but f*****g fabulous!
Ians swimsuit sketch
These awards gave me confidence early on that I was in fact a good designer, without which, who knows, I might not have had the guts to pursue my dream.


For this reason, I’ve been a long-time supporter of an industry award for young student bridal designers. Giving these awards is really special, as I know the impact and possibility that opportunities like these bring, as well as feeling like the Father Christmas of fab frocks.


I’ve won over 20 awards during my career, in the US & UK, for my bridal collection, MOB collection and most recently in 2015 for our flagship store. I’ve got some wonderful, although patchy memories of the ceremonies, and each one has played a part in giving me the confidence to push myself creatively.

When I launched my label in 2002, there was nothing in the industry with my style – it was risky, uncharted taffeta territory. Brides slowly got on board with my theatrical, quirky diva look and the industry responded to my innovation by awarding me Designer of the Year 4 years in a row, 2004-7. It was this encouragement in the early days that anchored my loyalty to myself and my signature handwriting.

I was then honoured the following year with a special contribution to the industry accolade. It’s a shame that Harrogate, home of the awards, doesn’t have a Chinese Theatre where I can narcissistically cement my hands outside. Alas, when the struggles, frustration and insecurities, aka ‘diva designer demons’ creep their my into my life, I look at this award, and knowing that somehow I have helped shape the modern bridal landscape gives me armour to cope.

Awards aren’t just a change to get the gladrags on and fill a display cabinet, they are symbols, reminders and a safety blanket for many who achieve them, and I’m getting a bit cold.

Vote here: www.hitched.co.uk/awards



The story behind my designs can be very interesting, some exceedingly more juicy than others.

I thought I’d start answering the popular questions brides have about their dresses…


What was the inspiration for this dress?

I just fell in love with the laser cut leaves, even I can get bored of looking at lace, but these leaves just caught my eye and immediately got my creative juices flowing.

Any interesting stories?

My original design had an illusion neckline, long sleeves, and no belt. But it just wasn’t working, perhaps (raised eyebrow) I had overdone it with the petals? So I got my shears out and stripped it back. A glorious dior-esque 50’s ball gown emerged from the whirlwind of applique, (picture Edward Scissorhands sculpting ice!) Adding a belt  was the finishing touch to capture the new mood.

How did it get its name?

I felt it needed to be French and sexy, cool but still classic, and embody a powerful feminine essence. So we named it after Vanessa Paradis.

Style tips:

I designed a matching veil for this style, both a long and short, to enhance the impact of those fabulous leaves, so I’d keep it simple with your jewellery, and wear a flower in your hair for the reception when you take your veil off. If you choose a colour, pick this out with a darker shade in your flower.
To find out more about Paradis please click here: Paradis
To find your nearest Ian Stuart Boutique please click here: Ian Stuart Boutiques


Two weeks ago, I was invited to speak on the consumer affairs programme ‘You & Yours’ on BBC Radio 4.

I’m presuming you missed it, so I’m going to discuss the topic here, because I think it’s important and relevant for the modern bride.

The programme wanted my thoughts on ASOS announcing it was launching a bridal collection. This was the first I had heard of it. I raised my eyebrow when they told me, and I felt as if I’d prematurely slipped into the older generation bracket when I muttered to myself ‘what is this world coming to?’

My knowledge of ASOS is cheap.fast.fashion. Not exactly the words I associate with a wedding dress. To me, they look exactly that, and scream fad trend. Now, I’m no Mystic Meg, but I do have visions of brides looking back on their wedding photos and cringing. A crop top, seriously?


GETTING THE RIGHT SHAPE: going to a bridal shop allows you to try on shapes you wouldn’t have even considered. Many brides end up wearing a gown that looks nothing like what they originally thought they wanted.

SETTING THE SCENE: lots of lighting, big full length mirrors and space to practice walking, boutiques are equipped to help a bride see herself fully. Unless you’re rich and have a big house, getting your dress through the post and trying it in your bedroom won’t give you an honest reflection of how you will look and move on the day.
THE EXPERTISE: for any big first time purchase, expert guidance is definitely required to get the best product of you. I brought my first proper kitchen a couple of years ago, and it was only because of the adive from the consultant that we ended up with the perfectly designed and fucntioning ‘triangle’ for us. (Kitchen lingo I didnt know before, highlighting my case and point!) Bridal stylists have the expertise to guide you to the perfect dress that is right for YOU.

ADAPTING AND ALTERING A DRESS. A few points for this that only a boutique can offer:
1. Expert pinning; showing how a dress can be contoured to your body, and what a big difference altering it will make.

2. Design changes; because your dress is made to order, the consultant can advise you what can be done to the dress to make it even more special for you.

3. Alterations from a seamstress familiar with the dresses make all the difference to the final look.
ACCESSORISING: trying on veils, jewellery, headpieces, gloves, boleros, wraps ect can really transform the mood of a gown, help you realise its potential, and how a gown can work for you. Look at my gown Neptune, completely different looks with accessories!

This launch is big news in the bridal industry, as it could be potentially very damaging to us all. I couldn’t help but have a gossip with some of our boutiques, and get their thoughts on it…


“A bridal gown is likely to be the most important dress a woman will own  nd choosing the perfect one is a unique and special experience. We love sharing the ‘it’s my dress’ moment with our brides and celebrating with a glass of fizz and lots of excitement and talk about their big day. Buying from a boutique is much more than a purchase, it’s a service and an experience that brides won’t forget. Bridal stylists are trained to offer you advice on the best shapes for your body, the best fabrics for the look you want to achieve and the perfect complimenting accessories. Buying online you simply don’t get the special one to one advice you can expect from an experienced boutique. ” The Bridal Collection, Harrogate.


“This type of experience, knowledge and care simply does not exist when buying on-line and is not the type of journey one dreams about as a little girl becoming a bride!  The experience of choosing your gown is about so much more than buying a dress and is something that should be treasured and remembered fondly long after the wedding has taken place.” Anne Prisilla, Glasgowlimelight

“Why would anyone risk buying the most important dress they will ever wear from complete strangers over the internet, knowing they could end up with a fake and no chance of getting their money back, when they can buy from specialist stockists approved by the designer himself?” Limelight occasions, Huddersfield

“I think buying from a boutique gives the bride the real experience of being treated as special and making the whole experience a memorable and amazing time. You cannot buy that online !!” Truly Madly Deeply, Surrey

QUOTE ME: And if the day comes when you can pick up a wedding dress in Primark… I’ll have to leave the country, I don’t think I could see the wedding dress bastardised in such a way.


Being a well-known designer within the wedding world, (not quite a household name yet like those designers at Debenhams), I’ve been regularly approached to make an array of TV appearances.

Most are ridiculous and I turn them down straight away. As much as I fancy myself as the Gok Wan of bridal, I’m not prepared to commit career suicide for my 15 minutes of fame.


I learned the negative impact of TV when on of my dresses appeared on My Big Fat Gypsy Weddings. Imagine my horror when I was indulging in every wedding dress designer’s guilty pleasure, secretly watching Britain’s latest reality TV craze, bitchily critiquing each gown as if I were a judge on ‘Project Runway Bridal Special’, only to be faced with my beloved Dauphine ready for roasting.

And whilst she was probably one of the most reserved brides on the show (ever!), due to the stigma of the show, we had brides calling our stockists the next day cancelling their beautiful dresses!


Across the pond was a different story. I received a call from our American office to tell me that Pandora, daughter of ‘Beverly Hills Housewife’ Lisa Vanderpump, was getting married in one of my dresses, it would be broadcast on American TV, and that it was Dauphine, yes, the very same dress! She looked jaw droppingly sensational, and thanks to several mentions of my name, brides went mad for that gown, and it became our US best seller and also ended up being very popular in the UK!

These parallel instances taught me the ‘make or break’ power of TV. Understandingly, I’ve been very wary ever since.


The Vanderpump wedding spawned my obsession with the whole ‘Housewives’ franchise. So when I was asked by the TV company making the UK version of The Real Housewives of Cheshire, if they could bring Magali in to my shop to look for a wedding dress, I almost burst.

I know Cheshire isn’t exactly the UK’s answer to Beverly Hills. McArthur Glen Cheshire Oaks is hardly Rodeo Drive but I do love a glamorous, sassy, diva no matter where she resides! I think you can tell that I don’t get inspired by the latest boho barefoot folk singer…NO! I’m Dolly Parton, Sophia Loren, Elizabeth Taylor, Beyonce… MEGA DIVA GLAM all the way!

I didn’t hesitate to say yes! I couldn’t wait to welcome some housewives into my shop.

But I must say, I was surprised (and slightly disappointed) at the lace of Diva Tantrums. I was quite looking forward to witnessing some behind the scenes  dramas, and having something to gossip about. I was quite hopeful at first as walking in they all looked like super sex Glamazons who could go all Naomi in a flash!

Magali was wonderfully down to earth, we hit it off straight away. Sharing Dutch heritage, we bonded over a love of the salty liquorice from our homeland! And, despite her gorgeous body, face, nails, skin, hair, boobs, once in the changing room, like any other bride, she had her own insecurities that she wanted to hide on her wedding day.

I couldn’t get over how someone so fabulously diva glam could be insecure about anything. I learned that no matter who the bride is, or what she looks like, the story is always the same.

And so… the beauty of the wedding dress… it is designed to remove those insecurities for one day and make you feel as beautiful on the inside as you look through the eyes of others.

I think Magali looked so incredibly beautiful when she renewed her vows, and I’m guessing by the look on her face she felt it too.
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We want to know your story, how did you meet?

We met at a ‘disco animals’ fancy dress party. Tom was wearing a monkey suit minus the head and feet and I was in leopard print and an afro wig. We spent most of the evening talking about our favourite Bob Dylan songs. The next day was his birthday so I took him out for a birthday breakfast and the rest is history.

How did he propose?

Tom proposed on a Tuesday morning in February. We were both getting ready for work, I was pulling my boots on when I turned around to find him on one knee! He proposed, I cried, and said yes and then we had to get the train for work! It was a complete surprise even though we’d been together for 6 years!3
How did you know that your Ian Stuart Dress was the right choice for your big day?

I had already tried on 30 dresses before I found my dress. They had all been quite floaty, unstructured dresses so this was my wild card dress and I tired it because I was really attracted to the layers on the bodice. When I tired it on, it all suddenly made sense!

It was just such an amazing fit, so surprisingly comfortable and looked so much better than anything else – I didn’t ever want to take it off. I felt really upright and self-contained in the dress and that felt amazing, and just what I needed on a nerve wrecking day. I still wish I could wear it everyday it’s so beautiful!

Was there a theme/colour theme at your wedding?

I did my doctorate in evolution and Tom is a keen gardener so we had a naturalistic/botanical theme, with things under bell jars as table centre pieces (shells, lotus flower heads, microscopes, phrenology heads to name a few). There were ivy trails everywhere and succulents for favours. It was just as we pictured and everyone was so curious about the bell jars!2

Did you incorporate any specific traditions in your wedding, as as ‘something old, something new, borrowed and blue’?

I’m Jewish, so we were able to incorporate some traditional Jewish customs, such as the breaking of the glass and our fathers recited a lovely blessing in Hebrew and English. The prayer is usually said to children on the Sabbath and wishes them wellness and happiness. It was a really special moment for us.

Do you have any advice to share with women who are about to embark on this incredible journey of planning their wedding and selecting their wedding dress?

Don’t rest until you find the dress that is going to be with you on that day of transition from single women to married women. Even if you’ve been together for years, it really does feel different being married, so that day is so special.5

Bride: Tanya Carpenter
Groom: Tom Carpenter
Bridal Gown: Monet, Killer Queen Collections
Boutique: Fairytale Weddings, Towcester
Wedding Date: 24/05/2015
Location: Burloes Hall, Hertfordshire
Photographer: Michelle Lindsell Photography


Coloured silks, taffetas and laces are to me what his oils were to Monet. I’m not suggesting that I’m making masterpieces, (although… I think a few dresses have come close if I do say so myself!) simply that there is an essential elements to creating your greatest work, and for me, that is colour.
blogLooking back, it was seeing this very picture as a design student that sparked my love affair with soft colours and ball gowns. There is something very MGM, very Dior and very Princess about the combination. When I started by own label, it was this unashamedly romantic mood that mystified me as a teen that I wanted to re-create with my dresses. Colour became my trademark.

Make it Pink! Make is Blue!
Can you remember that fabulous scene from Sleeping Beauty when Flora and Merryweather are fighting over the colour of Aurora’s dress? I will confess, I can relate to those fairies much more than a man in his mid-forties should be able to.

I use my signature colours and fabrics in each collection, and offer a designer in around 4 colour-ways, so when it comes to deciding what two colour ways to make the sample dress in, those damn plump little fairies take residence on my shoulders. For days I toy between pale lilac, rose, powder blue, gold, taupe, honey, porcelain, the list goes on.

I’ve illustrated some examples for you below, to better understand my pain! You can see how dramatically different, and distinctively beautiful the same dress in a different colour can be.
Chiquitita double
Pracatan-doubleThe moral of the story: if you find a great style but aren’t keen on the colour in the shop, don’t disregrd it yet! Ask the boutique if they can loan an alternative colour option, it could be your dream dress. Learn from Flora and Merryweather here, they both adored and despised the same gown due to their penchant for pink and blue!

Dramatic Colour 

A strong colour is a fabulous way to express your unique sense of style, and really go again the traditional grain. Do you think Gwen Stefani and Dita Von Teese would’ve been able to stay true to their alternative looks in an ivory dress? Me neither.

And I come baring good news if you don’t happen to have Galliano of Westwood in your contact book. I have a big repertoire of diverse fabric colours, so you are not limited to a bridal spectrum of colour with me!

If you find a style you love, it can be made in an alternative colour than the listed options. This gorgeous bride for example had Vanderbilt made in black!

Think Bigger Picture

As a crusader for colour, I love a well thought out colour story.

A coloured dress takes centre stage for building your colour story, but it does require you to think a little more about your wedding party photographs. Here is my advice for avoiding a colour clash that will haunt you forever.

Match men’s ties/cravats/waistcoats with your gown, consider having them made in the same fabric as your dress. Your boutique can help you with this. Unless your future hubby has frequent “Llewelyn-Bown-isms”, giving him a colour swatch and asking him to ‘tone it’, is a risk I wouldn’t take. May ‘Don’t Tell the Bride’ serve as your warning.

Tone in the matriarchs. God forbid your gorgeous pastel blue gown is stood next to Debenham’s latest hot new shade of sludge brown for the rest of your life. She will understand why a subtle silver was gently suggested!

Invite your guest to carry the colour story through, give them several suggestions that will enhance your vision. They don’t have to adhere to it, they just need not complain when the wedding photos come out and they don’t seem to be in many, or ask how on earth their fabulous coral dress is now slate grey!

Don’t let your bridesmaid overpower you, bright colours don’t tend to go well with coloured wedding dresses.


If you are already familiar with my designs, you’ll know how much I love big wedding dresses! It is my passion and my forte. The theatrical nature of them is what got me into bridal in the first place, and why I’ve stayed designing them for over 25 years!

What is it about a big dress that I love? The DRAMA DRAMA DRAMA, and did I mention the drama!? And I don’t mean ‘Drama Queen’, I mean ‘so jaw droppingly beautiful, powerful and iconic that you almost choke on your own gasp’ kind of drama. And I truly believe you can only get that with a big wedding dress.

Princess Feeling 

I’ve still not come to terms with the fact that I will never get to walk down the aisle in a big, ‘F’ off wedding dress, and feel that magical feeling that so many of my brides have felt. I’m sure my secret envy is palpable whenever I go to a wedding and the bride rocks up in a big dress!

What is that “Princess feeling” anyway? I do wonder what chemical reaction is going on in the brain and what emotion is flooding the body that makes someone embody a feeling of being royal. And God I’d love to know what it feels like!

I can only assume that it borders on a special kind of Disney ecstasy, if it is capable of making one both cry in joy and radiate with magical energy at the same time!

Myth of the Meringue

OK, we all saw and loved My Big Fat Greek Wedding, but I doubt anyone has a picture of Toula on their Pinterest board. I actually think films and shows depicting ‘meringue horror’ scenarios have put a lot of brides off wearing a big dress. The fear of looking like a 80’s throwback, cheap Diana knock off is very real, but darlings, don’t fear big dresses today are much more stylish than you think. w

I’m on a misson to bring back the #BigDress love. I want to see your big dress inspiration, whether it’s from bridal, the red carpet, costume from film or theatre!

Take a look at some of my favourites from my archive, I hope they inspire you: ianstuart-bride.com

Top tips for wearing a big dress:

1. Make sure the bodice fits like a glove, the last thing you want is to be constantly pulling the dress up because of the weight of the skirt.

2. Get a bustle put in for the evening so you can dance within 3 feet of your guests!

3. Wear shoes you are super confident to walk in, no one will see them anyway, you are having to contend with a mammoth gown.

4. Then practice walking in it, you should NOT have to touch or pick up your dress when you walk. (Biggest bugbear on a bride)

5. Bigger is always better!


Official blog for the UK's most creative and original bridal wear designer.

Ian is devoted to creating gowns that are quite simply works of wearable art.